Steam cooking alters phenolic profile and inhibitory effects of African nutmeg (Monodora myristica) seeds on critical enzymes associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus

A.A. Stephen

Abstract



Background:African nutmeg (Monodora myristica) seeds form an important part of diet and folkloric medicine in diabetes management across the world. They can either be consumed in raw or cooked forms. The influence of steam cooking on phenolic profile and enzymes (alpha glucosidase and alpha amylase) inhibitory effects of African nutmeg (Monodora myristica) seeds was assessed.
Methods: African nutmeg seeds were milled into powder; soaked in distilled water and cooked for 10 and 20 minutes, respectively. The phenolic profile of the raw and cooked African nutmeg extracts were subsequently analyzed. The ability of the extracts to inhibit alpha glucosidase and alpha amylase activities was determined.
Results: Caffeic acid, luteolin, quercetrin, rutin and quercetin were statistically significant (p<0.05) higher in cooked African nutmeg than the raw. Furthermore, statistically significant (p? 0.05) elevations in alpha glucosidase and alpha amylase inhibitory activities of African nutmeg were observed with steam cooking.
However, acarbose had better alpha glucosidase and alpha amylase inhibitory effects when compared to raw and cooked African nutmeg. The increased enzymes inhibitory activities observed in cooked African nutmeg could perhaps be linked to the increased availability of the metabolizable forms of the bioactive constituents.
Conclusion: The observed inhibition of enzymes activities by raw and cooked African nutmeg seeds may probably be part of their mechanisms of action in eliciting antihyperglycemic effects according to folklore.However, African nutmeg seeds cooked for 20 minutes

Keywords


African nutmeg; cooking; antioxidant; alpha amylase; alpha glucosidase

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